Heavy Metal Reference Guide and Discgraphy


Site Login
Message Board!

Newest Additions
Newest Comments
Audio Samples
Top 100 Rated CDs
Band Homepages
Cover Songs
Submit CDs to BM
Links

About the Site
Site Contributors


View Bands by Genre:
Classic Metal (493)
Christian Metal (38)
NWOBHM (55)
Power Metal (310)
Progressive Metal (159)
Speed/Thrash (268)
Death Metal (145)
Black Metal (56)
Doom (23)
Doom-Death (29)
Sludge Doom (9)
Stoner Doom (9)
Atmospheric Metal (19)
Folk Metal (12)
Gothic Metal (40)
Grindcore (5)
'90s Alternametal (39)
Industrial Metal (18)
Rap Metal (10)
Defies Classification (41)

THE Heavy Metal Reference on the Internet!

Bands: 1740     CDS: 6431     Songs: 73334

   


(Banner ads are FREE for bands and labels. Email me if interested.)

Donate $50    Donate $20    Donate $10    Donate $5    Donate $2   
Your ongoing support of Brutal Metal is appreciated!

#s A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Compilations    Soundtracks

Motorhead Band Picture

Motorhead

Bad Magic

Motorhead Homepage

(click on Artist's name above to return to artist's main page)

Category: Heavy Metal

Year: 2015

Label: UDR Music

Catalog Number: UDR057P18

Average Rating: 90 / 100 (1 rating)

(Log in to rate this CD)

Motorhead Bad Magic Album Cover

Personnel
Lemmy Kilmister Vocals, Bass
Mikkey Dee Drums
Phil Campbell Guitars, Piano track 13

Brian May Guitar track 5
Tracks
1.  Victory Or Die  
2.  Thunder & Lightning  
3.  Fire Storm Hotel  
4.  Shoot Out All of Your Lights  
5.  The Devil  
6.  Electricity  
7.  Evil Eye  
8.  Teach Them How To Bleed  
9.  Till the End  
10.  Tell Me Who To Kill  
11.  Choking On Your Screams  
12.  When the Sky Comes Looking for You  
13.  Sympathy for the Devil  

If you see any errors or omissions in the CD information shown above, either in the musician credits or song listings (cover song credits, live tracks, etc.), please post them in the corrections section of the Brutal Metal forum/message board.

The music discographies on this site are works in progress. If you notice that a particular Motorhead CD release or compilation is missing from the list above, please submit that CD using the CD submission page. The ultimate goal is to make the discographies here at Brutal Metal as complete as possible. Even if it is an obscure greatest-hits or live compilation CD, we want to add it to the site. Please only submit official CD releases; no bootlegs or cassette-only or LP-only releases.

EPs and CD-singles from Motorhead are also welcome to be added, as long as they are at least 4 songs in length.




Existing comments about this CD

From: Doghouse Reilly Date: June 9, 2021 at 18:22
Even at the time of its release, Bad Magic overshadowed by Lemmy's very obviously failing health. His PR team did their best to put on a good face for the previous two or three years, and it made the whole operation seem smarmy and dishonest—the opposite of what the man stood for. "Lemmy just needs to rest ... minor procedure ... back to full strength very soon ... better than ever." Bullshit! We all saw those sad videos from the last few months of Lemmy hanging on mic stand, walking with a cane, laboring for breath, forgetting which song he was singing. And so here is the final album, most of the music written by the other guys, Lemmy sounding hoarse and weak in places, rather than gruff and curmudgeonly, and this somehow highlighting the cliched nature of many songs. Lemmy had been singing about "shooting out all your lights" for decades, so why not have a song with that title? Even with the historical context put aside, Bad Magic is down there with Snake Bite Love, Kiss Of Death and

From: Doghouse Reilly Date: June 9, 2021 at 18:37
... and Motorizer as one of the band's less-inspired (and less-inspiring) albums. As the final statement from such a legendary band, it's hard to listen to, quite honestly. In the later part of his life, Lemmy underwent the same kind of transformation Ozzy did. There was Teddy Bear Ozzy, and there was Grandpa Lemmy. He went from being a straight-shooting outlaw to a crusty but lovable old man. When Rolling Stone profiled him in about 2008, it was hard not to see him as a bit of a relic, stuck in the past and almost kind of pathetic. We blamed those metal-hating snobs at Rolling Stone for drawing him that way, but secretly we wondered—is that how he seems to everyone who doesn't worship his music like we do? And are they maybe not 100% wrong? And what does it say about us that we idolize someone whose second-greatest claim to fame (and a very close second at that) was being an unapologetic, functioning alcoholic?


You cannot leave comments for this CD because you are not currently logged in. Please click here to log in or create a Username for leaving comments.

 

Designed and maintained by Webmaster
© 2000-2020. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy

Top